Iraq’s new prime minister

Adil Abdul Mahdi has now been nominated as the new prime minister by Barham Salih to nominate the cabinet for a month’s vote in parliament. He has several features that interact with him, requiring clever and possibly different considerations.

One of Abdul Mahdi’s most important features is his emphasis on being technocratic. The fact is, though he has a history of membership in the Supreme Council, and there are now interactions between him and this parliament, he has tried to make himself independent and technocratic by going back to the past few years.

Iraq is not in a good position to provide services to the general public. The problems with water and the frequent shortcomings of electricity and corruption in the country’s administrative and financial system, on the one hand, and the widespread wings of the government with the relative end to the security scourges caused by the presence of ISIS in the country, has caused the people of this country to expect A special case of the possible government of Adel Abdul Mahdi.

People’s expectations and Abdul Mahdi’s emphasis on being technocratic will make him more strenuous in addressing the problems of the people, to the extent that he is likely to adjust part of Iraq’s foreign relations to such a necessity. Therefore, the exact understanding of the conditions of Iraq and the principles of Adil Abdul Mahed’s behavior is an indispensable necessity in the current situation to consolidate Iran’s relations with Iraq. Any false prioritization can provide grounds for plotting against the two countries.

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Saudi Arabia and Bab Al Mandab

The Saudi Minister of Energy, Industries, and Mines recently announced that the country’s oil transportation will be restored through the Strait of Baghdad. Saudi Arabia, meanwhile, said it would temporarily stop shipping oil through the Strait of Bhalbalk, due to what Ansarullah attacked with its two oil tankers.

Saudi Arabia was explicitly trying to blame Bab al-Mandab on the one hand for Ansarullah’s behaviour and, on the other hand, by condoning Ansarullah and Iran in a situation where Iranian political and military officials threatened to prevent oil exports from the region under certain conditions. To increase the pressure on the United States and some Western actors on Iran and Ansarullah. Therefore, while Riyadh never paid the damage caused by Ansarullah attacks, this time they spoke of oil tankers carrying two million barrels of oil claiming that the two tankers were attacked by Ansarullah.

The fact is that the Saudi decision to cut oil exports from Bab Al Mandab was not taken seriously and effectively broke. The most important sign for this claim is the assessment of the price of oil. If this threatening Saudi decision was valid, it would have to show its effect on oil prices very soon, but that did not. At the media level, this decision was not much in line with, and other effective actors did not express concern over the security of the Strait.