The Syrian crisis and the dire problem of refugees

Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan are the three main countries in the Western Asia region, which have been deeply involved in the Syrian refugees.
In the Turkish presidential and parliamentary elections scheduled to be held tomorrow, one of the rare issues that are almost agreed upon by all candidates is to organize a Syrian refugee issue. Erdogan has promised that after the election, it will seek to accommodate Syrian refugees residing in Turkey in the safe areas of northern Syria. There are more than three million and five hundred Syrian refugees in Turkey.
Lebanon, according to President Michel Aoun, has hosted one million and eight hundred Syrian refugees. In an interview with German Chancellor Merkel, Aoun has requested that the issue of displaced people be considered outside the political agreement of the major powers and be resolved more quickly.
In Jordan, though, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has stated that 660,000 Syrian refugees are in Jordan, but Jordan’s statistics are almost double that figure. The Jordanian king said recently that the Jordanian people have been responsible for the presence of the Syrian refugees and others. The presence of refugees in Jordan is one of the reasons for the country’s recent economic crisis.
Although the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has announced that 90% of Syrian refugees who are present in Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan are willing to return to their country, among these three countries, the Syrian refugee population in Turkey is more likely than Erdogan’s policies. He seeks to maximize this issue in the Syrian crisis. Erdogan’s excuses for the occupation of some of the northern areas of Syria are refugee settlements, although the real reason was something else. In any case, the issue of displaced people is one of the most important aspects of the Syrian crisis that will not be resolved until the end of the crisis.

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